Spine Biomechanics

Chronic low back pain is a significant public health problem in industrialized society. The intact spine carries the upper body and external loads, allows motion in a physiological range and protects the spinal cord. These different demands necessitate a high degree of complexity with various sources for disorders and pain. The Julius Wolff Institute conducts research in order to counter pain causes and to further optimize the pain treatment.

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Featured Publications

  • Dreischarf M, Pries E, Bashkuev M, Putzier M, Schmidt H

    Differences between clinical "snap-shot" and "real-life" assessments of lumbar spine alignment and motion - What is the "real" lumbar lordosis of a human being?


    The clinical "gold-standard" for measuring lumbar lordosis and its motion are radiological "snap-shots" taken while standing and during upper-body flexion and extension. The extent to which these clinically assessed values characterise lumbar alignment and its motion in daily life merits discussion. A non-invasive measurement-system was employed to measure lumbar lordosis and lumbar motion in 208 volunteers during daily activities. In this study was shown that short-term examinations of lumbar lordosis differ considerably from the average values during real-life.

    J Biomech 2016; 49(5):638-644.

  • Reitmaier S, Graichen F, Shirazi-Adl A, Schmidt H

    Separate the Sheep from the Goats: Use and Limitations of Large Animal Models in Intervertebral Disc Research


    Approximately 5,168 large animals (pigs, sheep, goats, and cattle) were used for intervertebral disc research in identified studies published between 1985 and 2016. Most of the reviewed studies revealed a low scientific impact, a lack of sound justifications for the animal models, and a number of deficiencies in the documentation of the animal experimentation. The scientific community should take suitable measures to investigate the presumption that animal models have translational value in intervertebral disc research. Recommendations for future investigations are provided to improve the quality, validity, and usefulness of animal studies for intervertebral disc research.

    J Bone Joint Surg Am 2017; 99(19):e102.

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Publications since 2006

Results 1 to 10 of total 68


Results 1 to 10 of total 68